erica.mills's Student Data For Lecture 372163
Transcript: 
<transcript> <points> <main_point time="0"> <text><![CDATA[Hello, my name is David.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="2"> <text><![CDATA[In this lesson, we will discuss the role that nonverbal communication, body language, and listening play in your relationships at work and at home.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="11"> <text><![CDATA[Let's begin.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="15"> <text><![CDATA[Most successful HR professionals are excellent at reading and understanding nonverbal language, especially during the interview process.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="22"> <text><![CDATA[The interviewer's nonverbal language can also help or hinder a candidate, so we want to be careful of our nonverbal language when interviewing someone.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="30"> <text><![CDATA[Nonverbal language accounts for a large part of communication.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="34"> <text><![CDATA[Without seeing and hearing the nonverbal clues, it is easier to have misunderstandings.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="39"> <text><![CDATA[Nonverbal language can include facial expressions, eye contact, standing or sitting posture, and the position of our hands.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="47"> <text><![CDATA[Our tone of voice, loudness or softness, and gestures can also be part of body language.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="52"> <text><![CDATA[The better we can get at knowing what our own body language is telling others and reading others' body language, the better we can get at communicating well with others.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="64"> <text><![CDATA[Consider the use of digital forms of communication, such as e-mail and text messaging.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="69"> <text><![CDATA[These forms of communication do not allow us to read another's body language, which can often result in misconceptions about what another is saying.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="77"> <text><![CDATA[Use of "smiley" icons can make this clearer, but often people cannot detect sarcasm and other nonverbal communication cues.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="84"> <text><![CDATA[If you have something important to communicate, it is better to communicate most of the time in person or via phone, so you can hear tone and see facial expressions.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="94"> <text><![CDATA[Another note to consider on body language is how body language can be different across cultures.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="100"> <text><![CDATA[For example, the OK sign (thumb and pointer figure put together to form a circle) means "great" or "fine" in the United States, but in Brazil, Germany, and Russia, this sign would be considered both rude and offensive.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="110"> <text><![CDATA[In Japan, this sign means you want the store to give you change in coins.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="114"> <text><![CDATA[When traveling, we often take for granted that gestures, and even interpersonal distance, or how far apart we stand from another person, are the same as they are at home, but obviously this is not the case.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="126"> <text><![CDATA[Different nonverbal language can be different wherever you go, so reading up on the place you'll be visiting can ensure you won't offend anyone while there.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="134"> <text><![CDATA[Having this information can also help us train our employees for overseas assignments.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="140"> <text><![CDATA[Listening is obviously an important part of communication.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="144"> <text><![CDATA[There are three main types of listening.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="147"> <text><![CDATA[Competitive or combative listening happens when we are focused on sharing our own point of view instead of listening to someone else.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="154"> <text><![CDATA[In passive listening, we are interesting in hearing the other person and assume we hear and understand what the person says correctly, without verifying.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="162"> <text><![CDATA[In active listening, we are interested in what the other person has to say and we are active in checking our understanding with the speaker.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="169"> <text><![CDATA[For example, we may restate what the person has said and then verify our understanding is correct.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="175"> <text><![CDATA[The feedback process is the main difference between passive listening and active listening.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="182"> <text><![CDATA[In this lesson, we've looked at the types of listening as well as nonverbal communication through body language or electronic modes of communication.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="189"> <text><![CDATA[Remember, when communicating with people at work or at home, patience and understanding is key for a strong and healthy relationship.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="197"> <text><![CDATA[If you'd like to learn more about communication, be sure to check out the other lessons in this series.]]></text> </main_point> <main_point time="202"> <text><![CDATA[]]></text> </main_point> </points> <definitions> <definition word="nonverbal language" definition="A type of communication that can include facial expressions and eye contact."/> <definition word="competitive or combative listening" definition="A type of listening that happens when we are focused on sharing our own point of view instead of listening to someone else."/> <definition word="passive listening" definition="A type of listening in which we are interesting in hearing the other person and assume we hear and understand what the person says correctly, without verifying."/> <definition word="active listening" definition="A type of listening in which we are interested in what the other person has to say and check our understanding with the speaker."/> </definitions> <html_text><![CDATA[<p><A HREF="Event:Time_0"> Hello, my name is David.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_2"> In this lesson, we will discuss the role that nonverbal communication, body language, and listening play in your relationships at work and at home.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_11"> Let's begin.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_15"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT">Most successful HR professionals are excellent at reading and understanding </A><A HREF="Event:Time_15|Word_nonverbal language"><span class="definition">nonverbal language</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_15">, especially during the interview process.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_22"> The interviewer's </A><A HREF="Event:Time_22|Word_nonverbal language"><span class="definition">nonverbal language</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_22"> can also help or hinder a candidate, so we want to be careful of our </A><A HREF="Event:Time_22|Word_nonverbal language"><span class="definition">nonverbal language</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_22"> when interviewing someone.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_30"> Nonverbal language accounts for a large part of communication.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_34"> Without seeing and hearing the nonverbal clues, it is easier to have misunderstandings.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_39"> Nonverbal language can include facial expressions, eye contact, standing or sitting posture, and the position of our hands.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_47"> Our tone of voice, loudness or softness, and gestures can also be part of body language.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_52"> The better we can get at knowing what our own body language is telling others and reading others' body language, the better we can get at communicating well with others.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_64"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT">Consider the use of digital forms of communication, such as e-mail and text messaging.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_69"> These forms of communication do not allow us to read another's body language, which can often result in misconceptions about what another is saying.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_77"> Use of "smiley" icons can make this clearer, but often people cannot detect sarcasm and other nonverbal communication cues.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_84"> If you have something important to communicate, it is better to communicate most of the time in person or via phone, so you can hear tone and see facial expressions.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_94"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT">Another note to consider on body language is how body language can be different across cultures.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_100"> For example, the OK sign (thumb and pointer figure put together to form a circle) means "great" or "fine" in the United States, but in Brazil, Germany, and Russia, this sign would be considered both rude and offensive.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_110"> In Japan, this sign means you want the store to give you change in coins.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_114"> When traveling, we often take for granted that gestures, and even interpersonal distance, or how far apart we stand from another person, are the same as they are at home, but obviously this is not the case.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_126"> Different </A><A HREF="Event:Time_126|Word_nonverbal language"><span class="definition">nonverbal language</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_126"> can be different wherever you go, so reading up on the place you'll be visiting can ensure you won't offend anyone while there.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_134"> Having this information can also help us train our employees for overseas assignments.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_140"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT">Listening is obviously an important part of communication.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_144"> There are three main types of listening.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_147"> Competitive or combative listening happens when we are focused on sharing our own point of view instead of listening to someone else.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_154"> In </A><A HREF="Event:Time_154|Word_passive listening"><span class="definition">passive listening</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_154">, we are interesting in hearing the other person and assume we hear and understand what the person says correctly, without verifying.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_162"> In </A><A HREF="Event:Time_162|Word_active listening"><span class="definition">active listening</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_162">, we are interested in what the other person has to say and we are active in checking our understanding with the speaker.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_169"> For example, we may restate what the person has said and then verify our understanding is correct.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_175"> The feedback process is the main difference between </A><A HREF="Event:Time_175|Word_passive listening"><span class="definition">passive listening</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_175"> and </A><A HREF="Event:Time_175|Word_active listening"><span class="definition">active listening</span></A><A HREF="Event:Time_175">.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_182"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT"></P><p ALIGN="LEFT">In this lesson, we've looked at the types of listening as well as nonverbal communication through body language or electronic modes of communication.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_189"> Remember, when communicating with people at work or at home, patience and understanding is key for a strong and healthy relationship.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_197"> If you'd like to learn more about communication, be sure to check out the other lessons in this series.</A><A HREF="Event:Time_202"></P></A>]]></html_text> </transcript>
Outline: 
<outline version="1.5"> <points> <main_point godTime="0" subPoint="0" index="0"><![CDATA[<p class="title">Nonverbal Communication and Listening </p>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="14" subPoint="0" index="1"><![CDATA[<span class="ll-bullet"><img src="https://aklearning.com/assets/img/slim_poll.png" width="30" height="10" vspace="0"/></span><p class="ll">Poll</p>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="15" subPoint="0" index="2"><![CDATA[<p class="a-head">Nonverbal Communication</p><span class="spacing"><br /></span>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="65" subPoint="0" index="3"><![CDATA[<span class="b-bullet"><img src="https://aklearning.com/assets/img/bullet.png" width="10" height="10" vspace="3"/></span><p class="b-head">Digital Communication</p>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="95" subPoint="0" index="4"><![CDATA[<span class="b-bullet"><img src="https://aklearning.com/assets/img/bullet.png" width="10" height="10" vspace="3"/></span><p class="b-head">Body Language and Gestures</p>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="139" subPoint="0" index="5"><![CDATA[<span class="ll-bullet"><img src="https://aklearning.com/assets/img/slim_youtube.png" width="30" height="10" vspace="0"/></span><p class="ll">Types of Nonverbal Communication</p>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="141" subPoint="0" index="6"><![CDATA[<p class="a-head">Listening</p><span class="spacing"><br /></span>]]></main_point> <main_point godTime="202" subPoint="0" index="7"><![CDATA[<span class="ll-bullet"><img src="https://aklearning.com/assets/img/slim_vs.png" width="30" height="10" vspace="0"/></span><p class="ll">Thought Question</p>]]></main_point> </points> </outline>
Location: 
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Student: 
Erica Mills
Minutes: 
3
Views: 
1
Status: 
2